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Education at the State House: Legislative Update for February 4

Last week was a busy one at the state's capitol. The House had it's first session of the year (the Senate meets for the...

Hearing for Ed Commissioner runs over six hours as packed room listens to testimony...

By 1 pm, when the hearing for Ed Commissioner nominee, Frank Edelblut was set to begin, the room was not only packed with people...
Kids around teachers desk

NH legislators debate full-day kindergarten funding

Since HB 155--the bill that funds full-day kindergarten--was introduced this session, legislators from both chambers have spoken out regarding full-day kindergarten programs. Senator David Watters (D-Dist....

Former state rep and city councilor: Killing kindergarten bill unfair to schools and taxpayers

Killing the bill that would have funded full-day kindergarten was a mistake, wrote former state rep Liz Blanchard.

Education funding challenges continue throughout New Hampshire: Kearsarge

The Concord Monitor published a "My Turn" piece by Wilmot selectman former state representative Tom Shamberg reflecting budget anguish in Kearsarge Regional School District (which...

Kindergarten goes viral…the number of districts offering full-day programs is on the rise

There's a new proposal in the 2016 legislative session to provide full adequacy funding for kindergarten. Here's what you need to know about the status of full-day kindergarten in New Hampshire.

Concord mom: full-day kindergarten could help attract and retain residents

Interested in the community's support for full-day kindergarten, Concord mom Maria Lucia Natkiel took measures into her own hands: she created her own survey...

Executive Council approves SAT for 11th graders–Union Leader

The Union Leader reported on the Executive Council's unanimous decision to approve the funding for the College Board SAT exam to be administered to...

Concord Monitor: New Hampshire failing students with inadequate education funding

The Concord Monitor questions whether $4,200/year is enough to provide even an "adequate" education.